Connect Kids To Care Program & Win #CHFClorex

About Connect Kids to Care:
Many parents can make a quick phone call to the doctor if they have a sick child. However, 1 in 5 children in the U.S. live in poverty and millions of children don’t have access to regular check-ups and timely doctor’s visits when sick. Without access to essential health care, many children go without treatment for common ailments, like asthma or cavities, which can lead to bigger problems if left untreated.

Children’s Health Fund (CHF), a non-profit organization committed to providing health care to the nation’s most medically underserved children and their families, teamed up with Clorox to launch Connect Kids to Care.

As part of Clorox’s commitment to preventive health for families, the company is donating half a million dollars to CHF to help support CHF’s goal of providing half a million health care visits to disadvantaged children across the country, over the next two years.

In addition, Clorox is donating $1.00 for each new ‘fan’ on the Clorox Facebook page, up to $100,000.

To help Clorox spread the word and help CHF provide health care visits to children in need you can:

  1. Connect: Visit the Clorox page on Facebook® (www.Facebook.com/Clorox) to learn more about the program and become a fan. Clorox will donate $1.00 to CHF for each new fan that joins the Clorox Facebook page from April 2010 and April 2012, up to $100,000.
  2. Tweet – join the Twitter storm on Monday, April 19 to help kickoff the program and get as many people as possible Tweeting and re-Tweeting with the hashtag #CHFClorox.
  3. Share: Help spread the word to friends and family by changing your Facebook status (additional details on Facebook.com/Clorox).
  4. Act: Visit the Clorox Facebook page to find out more and learn how a $10 donation can help CHF provide health care to children in need.

By starting conversations online, the Connect Kids to Care program will show people ways to maintain a healthier environment for their families through expert advice, wellness tips and consumer-generated ideas.

After helping make an impact on the lives of others, families will be encouraged to make sure they are doing all they can to maintain a healthier environment in their own homes. Ensuring that everyone is getting regular check-ups and practicing other healthy habits can impact an entire family and everyone in the surrounding communities. These habits include:

  • Encourage your family to wash their hands well with warm water and soap. This helps prevent the spread of infection.
  • Talk to your kids often about how they’re feeling. Simply asking this question can help you be better informed about any health problems your child may be experiencing.
  • Keep your kids on a regular teeth-brushing schedule. Watch them brush every now and then to make sure they’re using the proper technique.
  • Make sure you are all getting plenty of sleep, eating right, exercising and wearing warm clothes when it’s cold.
  • Disinfect frequently touched surfaces like light switches and counters to help reduce the spread of germs.
  • Keep the whole family up-to-date on important immunizations.

About the Children’s Health Fund
Children’s Health Fund, co-founded in 1987 by singer/songwriter Paul Simon and pediatrician/child advocate Irwin Redlener, MD, is committed to providing health care to the nation’s most medically underserved children through the development and support of innovative primary care medical programs; response to public health crises; and the promotion of guaranteed access to appropriate health care for all children.

The Fund works specifically to:

  • Support a national network of pediatric programs in some of the nation’s most disadvantaged rural and urban communities;
  • Ensure support of its flagship pediatric programs for homeless and other medically underserved children in New York City;
  • Advocate for policies and programs which will ensure access to medical homes that provide comprehensive and continuous health care for all children; and
  • Educate the general public about the needs and barriers to health care experienced by disadvantaged children.

About Clorox

Five investors, some salt ponds, and a very bright idea.

On May 3, 1913, five California entrepreneurs invested $100 apiece to do something that had never been done before: convert the brine available in the nearby salt ponds of San Francisco Bay into bleach using a sophisticated process of electrolysis. They located their offices in Oakland, California—where their headquarters remain today. In 1914, they named their brand Clorox.

An unlikely group of scientists
The investors were not a likely bunch to embark on such an enterprise: only one had any practical knowledge of chemistry. They were educated, though, in their guess that bleach would be a product soon in demand. By the end of the 19th century, after Louis Pasteur had discovered sodium hypochlorite’s potent effectiveness against disease-causing bacteria, bleach became a widely used disinfectant. Still, it wasn’t until Clorox introduced innovative technology that could produce both commercial-grade and household bleach products that bleach would became a proven and popular product.

A worthy experiment
Surviving the early years was a struggle. Directors repeatedly extended personal loans to pay mounting corporate debts. In 1916, an early investor in the business, William C.R. Murray, was named general manager. Mr. Murray’s wife, Annie, took on the responsibility of running their Oakland grocery store.

Mr. Murray ordered plant chemists to develop a less concentrated “household” version of the industrial-strength Clorox bleach formula, and Mrs. Murray decided to give free samples to her customers. Her idea would prove to be a key to the company’s survival.

A household essential
Mrs. Murray’s 5.25-percent sodium hypochlorite household bleach solution, bottled in 15-ounce amber glass “pints,” soon gained huge popularity. Households everywhere quickly recognized the formula as an effective and reliable domestic laundry aid, stain remover, deodorizer, and disinfectant.

Today, an estimated eight out of ten American households use Clorox® brand bleach, and Clorox® brand laundry and home cleaning products are sold in more than 100 countries in North America, South America, Europe, Africa and Asia. This cleaning agent, derived almost one hundred years ago from a salt pond, is now a cleaning essential used in homes throughout the world.

My Take on This
I always love seeing companies giving back and this is definitely a great example of it. It will not take much effort from all of you, so I hope that you will join me on Monday and make a different for disadvantaged children!


WIN THIS!

Clorox is going to give one lucky Dad of Divas reader a Clorox Children’s Health Fund gift pack.

To Enter:

Follow me on Twitter and tweet:

Help @Clorox help @chfund provide half a million health care visits to kids in need and win at http://bit.ly/drohwh #CHFClorox

I will choose 1 person who tweets and helps spread the word! Just reply here after you tweet.

Other Bloggers participating:

  • Consumer Queen
  • Plus Size Mommy
  • According To Rachel
  • My DFW Mommy
  • Dad of Divas
  • Mom’s Favorite Stuff
  • My SLC Mommy
  • West Michigan Mommy
  • Inside the Chatter Box
  • Organize With Sandy
  • Coupon Princess
  • Couponing to Disney
  • Superdumb Supervillain


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